Issue Eight

Fall 2014

Crossroads Ventures: How a Boston Social Enterprise is Reducing Youth Violence

Social enterprise has become one of the leading models for international development, recognized as one of the most effective methods to sustainably address issues from poverty, to sanitation, to women’s rights. However, social enterprise is not just successful in developing countries; it is also ...

Being Her Own Boss: Franchising and Empowerment in Johannesburg

For many office employees in the developed world, the idea of working from home is one that brings about feelings of envy; it means money saved on petrol and the avoidance of endless traffic jams on overcrowded highways echoing angry car horns. Having a home office means scheduling your own work ...

Expensive Mistakes and Thoughtful Solutions: Bringing Nutrient Rich Foods to the Poor

Micronutrient deficiency affects 1 in 3 people in the developing world. Poor access to iodine, iron, and Vitamin A cause major problems in the long-term health of affected children. Adults and children alike are more susceptible to illness, infection, anemia, physical and cognitive retardation, ...

The Next Step: Why Are So Many Micro Entrepreneurs Struggling to Scale Beyond Subsistence?

Impressive both in impact and scale, microfinance has reached over 200 million poor people around the world. Many of them have been able to use microloans to overcome capital constraints and start or grow a small business. The ideal microfinance borrower, highlighted on many websites of large ...